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Email Marketing Cta Best Practices

It might also pay to look into how your competitors are using CTAs in their emails. By examining what they are doing a better job of, you can glean some tips on how to improve your CTAs. Use visual cues to influence readers to click your call-to-action. Things like writing the CTA in a bold or contrasting font, making it a different color than the rest of the email, or separating it from the body of the email with boxes or lines will greatly improve its performance. Our biggest takeaway from our research is that simple sells. CTAs that were more creative had a lower click-through rate, and simple, straightforward wording performed the best. Still, you should test what works best for your target audience (there are no hard and fast rules), and always be sure to include a CTA.

From testing and evaluating the many different elements in your email, it can be concluded that a strong call to action is motivating for readers. It shows them the purpose of the page and what you want them to accomplish. At Engine Yard, our projects involved a strong call to action on every page because of its ability to motivate customers. Our work has been recognized for this particular area by winning awards for our website designs, emails, and overall marketing campaigns. Practice makes perfect when it comes to email marketing and there is always room for improvement in this field. To take your email campaigns to the next level analyze your data carefully, keep constant track of customer feedback, conduct more testing, and test new strategies. The way forward is by listening to your audience, trying out different techniques, and pushing the envelope. It is up to you what you do with this information but by incorporating consumer feedback into all of your future marketing efforts you will be much more successful in your campaign results!

As an email marketer, you likely know that a call-to-action is one of the most important elements of your email. After all, your calls-to-action are what get subscribers to take the next step. They’re often used in transactional emails—like a sale announcement or order receipt—because they bring people to a specific landing page where they can make a purchase or read more about the sale. But including them in newsletters and other types of emails can also help boost engagement and clicks throughout your entire campaign.

When you have a call-to-action button in your email, you want to get it seen.

When you have a call-to-action button in your email, you want to get it seen. That’s why it’s so important to place your call-to-action button where it can be easily seen. The best place for your call-to-action button is usually on the left side of the screen—but that doesn’t mean that other places won’t work just as well!

But what happens if you don’t have enough room for your CTA? Sometimes we have emails with really long subject lines (or even no subject line at all), or lots of content or images filling up every inch of our templates. This means there isn’t any space left over for a CTA at all! Don’t worry though: there are still plenty of ways around this issue! You can try these three different approaches:

  • Place buttons above the fold (meaning before people scroll down) – This method helps ensure that readers see them immediately upon opening their emails without needing to scroll down first; however, since not everyone will see those buttons until after scrolling past them once they’ve opened up an email from their inboxes then this method might not always work out so well depending upon how many people actually read through each individual message before moving onto something else entirely different instead (or worse yet never even notice anything happening). So keep in mind…

It’s a misconception that only the first button in the email will get clicked.

It’s a misconception that only the first button in an email will get clicked. The truth is, it’s all about context.

Mobile devices are small and people are busy – they don’t want to scroll through a long stream of text or images to find what they need. So if your main call-to-action (CTA) is somewhere near the top of your email content, you may be missing out on valuable opportunities for conversions when it comes to mobile devices.

Instead, consider placing secondary CTAs at various points throughout your content so that users can easily click on them from wherever they happen to be reading their emails (and not just from their inbox).

While it’s true that the first call-to-action button in your email will most likely be clicked more than others, that doesn’t mean that other buttons won’t be clicked.

While it is true that the first call-to-action button in your email will most likely be clicked more than others, that doesn’t mean that other options won’t be clicked at all.

  • The first button gets more clicks because of primacy effect. This means that people are more likely to choose the first option they see.
  • Other buttons get clicked too because of recency effect. This means that people remember the last choice they made (or were reminded of).

That said, don’t forget about mobile users.

When it comes to responsive design, you need to be aware that mobile users may not be able to see the first CTA button at all. They may also be able to click on it, but then find themselves taken somewhere other than where they wanted to go. If you’re using a single-button form, there’s really no way around this issue; however, if you do use multiple buttons in your CTAs (as we recommend), then these issues are less likely to occur because each button can take users directly where they want to go without any need for redirecting after clicking.

The research found that the second button was clicked 4% more often on desktop than on mobile devices.

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Mobile clicks were split more evenly across multiple buttons because of thumb movement and screen size.

Mobile users are more likely to click on the second button, but less likely to click on the first and third. This could be because of thumb movement or screen size. The second button is closer to where your finger would be when you’re holding a phone, so it’s easier for you to press it. It also has more space around it, so there are fewer distractions.

The fourth CTA button was clicked more often in mobile test groups than in desktop groups. However, this doesn’t mean it should always be included: if there are multiple CTAs on a page and they’re all equally important (like “Learn More” and “Contact Us”), putting them all at equal distances from one another makes sense—you’ll give people who prefer touchscreens just as much flexibility as those with mice or trackpads!

Where your call-to-action is placed matters because that determines where your subscribers click… most of the time.

Remember that where your call-to-action is placed matters because that determines where your subscribers click.

The first button will always get the most clicks, but the second and third buttons aren’t far behind.

On mobile devices, the second button is clicked more than any other (and sometimes even more than the first).

On desktop devices, it’s much closer between first and second place as well as third place.

You can use these strategies for all kinds of emails, from newsletters and “happy birthday” messages to sale announcements or order receipts. In short, any email can benefit from a call-to-action button.

You can use these strategies for all kinds of emails, from newsletters and “happy birthday” messages to sale announcements or order receipts. In short, any email can benefit from a call-to-action button.

Call-to-action best practices:

  • Use a strong verb and make it clear what the reader will do next if they click on your CTA. For example: “Shop Now,” “Get Our Newsletter,” or “Find Out More.”
  • Make your CTAs stand out by using different colors or fonts than other parts of the email, or by putting them in a box so they stand out even more.
  • Keep CTAs short—the shorter they are, the more likely people will read them! Try to limit yourself to one sentence that clearly states what action you want readers to take next (or better yet, have them go straight through the entire process without clicking anywhere else).

Conclusion

We hope this research gives you the confidence to request more from your subscribers. Use these strategies for all kinds of emails, from newsletters and “happy birthday” messages to sale announcements or order receipts. In short, any email can benefit from a call-to-action button. Your email marketing program isn’t complete without calls-to-action. Sometimes you have to make your readers do something, and that’s where the call-to-action comes in. After the readers are engaged with your email, they need a bit of an invitation to take action.

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