How to Start Affiliate Marketing on Pinterest

So you’re interested in learning how to start affiliate marketing your Pinterest account for fun and profit, right? Well, so am I, and I think this is a great opportunity. Specifically, I’m interested in Pinterest becoming an attractive search engine optimization (SEO) option for my blog, so I can divert some of my tedious traffic from Google and focus it on Pinterest. So that’s one reason that I want to learn how to do this.

Today we’re going to go over how to start your Affiliate Marketing from Pinterest! This is a PDF with a few tips, ideas and how-to’s for starting your own Affiliate Marketing through Pinterest. One of the main reasons I love to use Pinterest in my affiliate marketing is because it’s a visual website. People love pictures! And they make the products look even better then they would by just looking at a photo.

Can You Add Affiliate Links on Pinterest?

“Pinterest is an amazing source of traffic for affiliate marketing because it can help drive visitors to your website on a daily basis,” says Latasha Peterson, Side Hustle Coach and Pinterest Strategist. “When visitors from Pinterest click on your Pinterest pin images they will be directed to your website which can help boost affiliate sales.”

That sounds exciting, but you might be wondering…are you allowed to put affiliate links on Pinterest? Is this all “above board?”

Yes! Using Pinterest for affiliate marketing is absolutely within the platform’s terms of service, so no worries there.

However, you’ll want to follow these best practices:

Check the rules of your affiliate programs – You need to check the rules of all of the specific affiliate programs you’re a part of. For example, the Etsy Affiliates Policy does not permit affiliates to post their links directly on Pinterest. Instead, Etsy Affiliates promote products in a blog post, and then link to that from their pins.

Provide value, not spam – Don’t just link to products and pages using the provided imagery and expect to make a killing. Instead, you need to offer your Pinterest audience something of value. Create an engaging blog post, video, or free guide. (We talk about this even more in the section on an example affiliate funnel.)

Disclose affiliate links – Be sure to disclose when you’re using an affiliate link. If you’re linking directly from a pin to an affiliate link, add #affiliate to the description. If you’re including affiliate links in your blog post, you don’t need to put that in your pin, but you should put it at the top of your blog post, and/or in your blog sidebar.

Affiliate Marketing on Pinterest: How Does it Work?

On to the important part—how does affiliate marketing work on Pinterest?

The TL;DR version: Create a Pinterest account, optimize it for your niche, apply to affiliate programs, and create pins with affiliate links.

Sounds easy, right?

Sure! If you just want to make a few bucks.

Technically, you don’t even need a website to make money on Pinterest. But if you’re playing the long-term game and want to make consistent income, you need a website.

And if you don’t want your accounts flagged, you need to spend a little time doing some research before you start posting affiliate links everywhere. (I’ve already done some of it for you—all you have to do is check out your program-specific terms, which we’ll talk about in a bit.)

How to upload an affiliate pin on Pinterest

So you have your eye-catching affiliate pin ready to go. Next, log in to your Pinterest business account and do the following. Follow along as I show the exact steps on my brand new Pinterest account.

 Click the + symbol on the top right and then select pin.

 Upload the pin you’ve created to promote the affiliate product.

Sometimes the product creator will give you a pre-made affiliate pin. You can use that as well, but make sure you use multiple pins (at least 3 different pins) to promote any affiliate product. You want to make sure you appeal to different audiences.

Copy and paste your original affiliate link into the website section.

Note that it’s against Pinterest’s policy to use Bit.ly, Pretty Link, or any other link shortener. You should always copy and paste the original affiliate link you received from the merchant or affiliate program.

Write a detailed description of the pin, focusing on 2-3 relevant keywords.

One keyword will be your main target keyword and the other(s) will be supporting keywords. You want to make sure your main target keyword appears in your pin title and pin description. That means you’ve optimized your pin to rank highly for that keyword. As a result, Pinterest is more likely to show your pin to someone who searches for the keyword. As you can see, Pinterest is a lot like Google. It wants to deliver fresh, relevant content to users. You can help the Pinterest algorithm do that by telling it exactly what your pin is about using keywords. That’s why Pinterest Search Engine Optimization (SEO) is so important.  

This is what my uploaded pin looks like before I save it to a board:

Save your affiliate pins to the most relevant, well-keyworded board.

This is crucial! Do NOT save your affiliate pins, or any pins for that matter, to generic, all-niche boards. You’d confuse Pinterest. When you share a new pin, the Pinterest algorithm goes to work to figure out what that pin is about. It determines this based on the image, the keywords used in the title and description, and the boards where the pin is saved. If you save your pin to a general board, you are missing an opportunity to signal to Pinterest what your pin is about. If Pinterest can’t tell what your pin is about, it won’t index the pin properly and users won’t be able to find it.

I saved my affiliate pin to a board called Affiliate Marketing on Pinterest, which is exactly what the pin is about. You only need to save your pin once for Pinterest to show it on search results and on users’ smart feeds. This is coming straight from the Pinterest team. The key is to make sure that the board you save that pin to is super relevant. That means it contains keywords in the title and description that reflect the topic of your pin.

If you want to learn the ins and outs of how Pinterest SEO and the Pinterest algorithm works, there’s no better course than Pinteresting Strategies. It’s the course that helped me master the Pinterest algorithm and better optimize my pins for clicks.  

How To Make Money on Pinterest With Affiliate Links (2020)

SEPTEMBER 3, 2020 BY SOMTO UGWUEZE 22 COMMENTS

How To Make Money on Pinterest With Affiliate Links (2020)

You’ve already learned about this wonderful passive income stream called affiliate marketing. Maybe at the moment, affiliate links are sprinkled throughout your blog posts. But did you know that you can make affiliate sales without writing a single blog post?

In this post, I’m going to talk about using Pinterest to promote your affiliate products. I’ll show you exactly how to make money on Pinterest with affiliate links.

This post contains affiliate links as explained in my disclosure policy.

Why Pinterest?

Pinterest is a visual search engine with a social component. It’s 320 million monthly active users, 70% of whom are women, use the platform to make buying decisions. They are trying to decide where to go on vacation, which diet to try, or what blogging courses to buy. Pinterest users also have spending power, with a median household income of about $75,000. These Pinterest statistics make the platform an attractive place for affiliate marketing.

While writing blog posts, such as reviews, tutorials, and product comparisons, is a great affiliate marketing strategy, it can be time-consuming. Using Pinterest allows you to get your affiliate links in front of potential buyers in a less time-intensive manner. You can create pins to promote your affiliate products directly on Pinterest. Today, I’ll go over how to create affiliate pins and upload them to Pinterest. The best part? You don’t even need a blog to do this!

You may have read my recent chat with a Pinterest expert, McKinzie Bean, where she shares tips to crush affiliate marketing on Pinterest without a blog. Now, we’re going to get into the specifics. This post will show you the exact step-by-step process to create pins with viral potential, write keyword-rich pin descriptions, and promote them on Pinterest. Let’s get started!

To begin with, I’ll walk you through the steps to upload an affiliate pin. Then we’ll go over the process to create a pin and perform keyword research. 

I created this affiliate pin to promote my favorite Pinterest affiliate marketing course, Pin To Profits: Affiliate Marketing. I used Canva Pro to make the pin. In the following section, I’ll show you how I uploaded this pin to Pinterest.

How to upload an affiliate pin on Pinterest

So you have your eye-catching affiliate pin ready to go. Next, log in to your Pinterest business account and do the following. Follow along as I show the exact steps on my brand new Pinterest account.

Click the + symbol on the top right and then select pin.

Upload the pin you’ve created to promote the affiliate product.

Sometimes the product creator will give you a pre-made affiliate pin. You can use that as well, but make sure you use multiple pins (at least 3 different pins) to promote any affiliate product. You want to make sure you appeal to different audiences.

Copy and paste your original affiliate link into the website section.

Note that it’s against Pinterest’s policy to use Bit.ly, Pretty Link, or any other link shortener. You should always copy and paste the original affiliate link you received from the merchant or affiliate program.

Write a detailed description of the pin, focusing on 2-3 relevant keywords.

One keyword will be your main target keyword and the other(s) will be supporting keywords. You want to make sure your main target keyword appears in your pin title and pin description. That means you’ve optimized your pin to rank highly for that keyword. As a result, Pinterest is more likely to show your pin to someone who searches for the keyword. As you can see, Pinterest is a lot like Google. It wants to deliver fresh, relevant content to users. You can help the Pinterest algorithm do that by telling it exactly what your pin is about using keywords. That’s why Pinterest Search Engine Optimization (SEO) is so important.  

This is what my uploaded pin looks like before I save it to a board:

Save your affiliate pins to the most relevant, well-keyworded board.

This is crucial! Do NOT save your affiliate pins, or any pins for that matter, to generic, all-niche boards. You’d confuse Pinterest. When you share a new pin, the Pinterest algorithm goes to work to figure out what that pin is about. It determines this based on the image, the keywords used in the title and description, and the boards where the pin is saved. If you save your pin to a general board, you are missing an opportunity to signal to Pinterest what your pin is about. If Pinterest can’t tell what your pin is about, it won’t index the pin properly and users won’t be able to find it.

I saved my affiliate pin to a board called Affiliate Marketing on Pinterest, which is exactly what the pin is about. You only need to save your pin once for Pinterest to show it on search results and on users’ smart feeds. This is coming straight from the Pinterest team. The key is to make sure that the board you save that pin to is super relevant. That means it contains keywords in the title and description that reflect the topic of your pin.

If you want to learn the ins and outs of how Pinterest SEO and the Pinterest algorithm works, there’s no better course than Pinteresting Strategies. It’s the course that helped me master the Pinterest algorithm and better optimize my pins for clicks.  

You may also like: How To Do Affiliate Marketing without a Blog: Expert Interview.

The importance of choosing the right boards

To drive home the importance of Pinterest SEO, I’ll share another example. Let’s say I save the affiliate pin above to a general group board called ‘Bloggers Share Your Best Pins.’ In the group board, there are pins about parenting, DIY, recipes, fashion, weight loss, and all sorts of topics. Because the board is a free-for-all, there are no relevant keywords for, well, any topic.

How is the Pinterest algorithm supposed to determine that my pin is about affiliate marketing? Sometimes you have to put yourself in the Pinterest algorithm’s shoes, as strange as that sounds. How can you make its job easier? Signal exactly what your pin is about by using the right keywords and posting only to relevant boards.

Don’t forget to post your affiliate pins to your own personal boards. When I share my affiliate pins, I start with my own relevant boards because they’re better optimized for SEO than my group boards. I carefully write my board descriptions to optimize them for keywords. Technically speaking, you don’t even need to share pins to group boards if you have well-optimized personal boards with high repin rates. The advantage of group boards is that they help you expand your reach.

How to disclose affiliate links on Pinterest

According to the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), you must disclose that you’re an affiliate anytime you promote affiliate products. Why? It’s to protect consumers from being misled. If they know you’re getting paid, they can make a more informed decision about whether to buy a product. Let’s say someone recommends you buy a DJI Mavic Pro drone, raving about all the amazing features. You’re immediately interested. Then you learn that the recommender is a brand ambassador and affiliate for DJI. Wouldn’t that make scrutinize what they said?  Maybe do more research? That’s the point of disclosures.

Notice how I disclose that this post contains affiliate links at the top? For affiliate pins, you can add one of the following hashtags at the end of the pin description.

  • “#affiliatelink”
  • “#sponsored”
  •  #ad

Disclosing affiliate links is mandatory. If you don’t do it, the FTC could fine you. I haven’t yet heard cases of people getting fined, but don’t take any chances. Just follow the rules.

Below you’ll see that I included #ad in the affiliate link I uploaded. I use #ad nowadays to remove any ambiguity about what my pin is. If a pin leads people to a sales page, its an ad.

Conclusion

Whatever you are selling or promoting, if you have a website, Pinterest can help you reach your audience there. If you are running an affiliate site on the topic of pets, Pinterest is a great place to start your business. You can push traffic exiting your pins to your chosen affiliate link, increasing sales for everyone involved.

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